Isabella Myers' Archive

Archive Module 5

Posted on: March 23, 2010

5 images of art

Twombly, Cy. “The First Part of the Return from Parnassus.” 1961 Art Institute of Chicago. 8 Mar 2010.

Klein, Yves. “Relief Eponge Blue Sans Titre (Untitled Blue Sponge Relief). 1960 Art Institute of Chicago. 8 Mar 2010

Costa, Vinicius. “Sculpture from Sandridge Series.”

<http://www.flickr.com/photos/vinicius_costa/4369026412/in/set-72157623338076925/&gt;

Laine, Laura. “Tiger of Sweden.” +46. <http://www.lauralaine.net/&gt;

Octavious, Paul. “Title unknown.” The Book Collection. <http://www.pauloctavious.com/&gt;

This reminds me of Aspen Mays’ Einstein book sculptures from the MCA Exhibition:

5 images of labor

Writings

This week, I got really into reading fashion magazines when I had to go out and buy some magazines for some specific collages. No particular writings made an impression on me, it was more just the nostalgic feeling of paging through a sensory overload. There’s a great tactile quality to the pages, there are smells in the perfume ads, and the smell of a fresh magazine in general, and then there is the intense visual aspect. Some magazines I read: Nylon, Cosmopolitan, Glamour, etc.

Song

Consequence by The Notwist [link]

Video

Law & Order SVU: Season 5 Episode 9 Control.

It’s just a really good episode of one of my favorite shows ever!!!

new artist

“Untitled”

2003

Collage cutout on paper; 94 x 72 1/2 inches

“I’m interested in how an image that is so well composed and so clear and so objective- made out of these disparate fragments- can be glued, forced together to create an image that will have a different reading from what the fragments said…Both sides are part of the images’ ambiguity, of not knowing exactly what I’m looking at, and then the clarity of the way it was composed.”
– Arturo Herrera

“All I Ask”

1999

Latex on wall

Installation view Wurttembergischer Kunstverein, Stuggart, Germany Collection

“All I Ask,” detail.

“Creating this all-over pattern made me think about American abstract expressionism, where we’re not confined with the limited space of the canvas or the window frame. It was a slow process of melding and blending to be able to create a seamless kind of narrative with no specific content.”

“The first idea was to recognize in those images of dwarves from ‘Snow White and the Seven Dwarves’ a very strong sense of connection with organic abstraction. It’s like a readymade modernist abstraction. Its round forms recall Brancusi, Arp. I took isolated fragments of these shapes from coloring books and I tried to unify them into an all-over pattern that would allow the viewer to take this image with an immediacy that, maybe, is not possible with the individual collages.”
– Arturo Herrera

“Untitled”

1997-1998

Mixed media collage on paper, 12×9 inches

“Since there is no direction- usually no title- you’re basically looking at this with your baggage of intellectual knowledge and your memories, desires and emotional life, all combined. So you make your own collage and then you bring it to the piece. You juxtapose yourself- attach yourself- to the image and then a new thing is created. You are fragmented, and the piece comes from fragmentation.”

“Untitled”

1997-1998

Mixed media collage on paper, 12×9 inches

“What I want is that this experience of the fragmented person and the fragmented image becomes a new whole, a hybrid experience. Nothing is ever sure in life…So I’m playing with that idea of ambiguity and uncertainty. And I’m welcoming that.”

“Before We Leave”

2001

Wool felt, 84×144 inches

“These works are based on ink drawings that I enlarged and then projected onto felt. It’s compressed wool. It cuts very easily with no threads, it’s pure pigment, and it behaves like paper. It comes in many, many colors and allows for the enlargement of any drawing into large scale.”

All images and text from PBS Art:21.

“Artwork Survey.” PBS Art 21 Arturo Herrera. <http://www.pbs.org/art21/slideshow/?artist=86&gt;

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